Posts Tagged ‘emotional approach’

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Women, Causes, and Ads: International Women’s Day

In Ads and other executions,Campaigns,Marketing Ethics on March 9, 2013 by Jox Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Talking to women, selling products, services, ideas, and any commodity imaginable have been proven to be profitable. Billion-dollar businesses thrive on women’s buying power. Advertising has come a long way when it comes to women empowerment. Ads have evolved with women as their roles changed, shifted, and escalated to new heights.

Yet International (Working) Women’s Day serves as a reminder that whilst it is worth celebrating gender equality, there are still issues that can be considered backward as culture, religion, or even ignorance can be a factor that hinders rights from being acknowledged and implemented. It’s always a step forward and two steps back in the feminist realm.

TIME Magazine hit the stands yesterday with a bold statement, “Don’t Hate Her Because She’s Successful” with a seemingly ubiquitous presence of Sheryl Sandberg that implied that we’re not going to get rid of her and her supposed cause easily. The statement pertains to one of Sandberg’s points on female’s rise to power that is inversely proportional to her likability. Now whether this is a publicity stunt for mercenary causes or a real cause about “rebooting Feminism”, I personally believe the latter but I shall not dwell on this.

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Image courtesy of TIME magazine

Timing is everything and the riveting cover opened up International Women’s Day on a positive note. It also happened to be a grand launch of Sandberg’s new book, Lean In and her new organization that has already gathered women of power. Given all these contact points that strategically hit the right buttons at the right time, the campaign seems to be moving full speed ahead.

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International Women’s Day is also a perfect platform for make up brands. L’Oreal has been truly effective with its “Because I’m/you’re worth it” tagline. One way to keep track of women’s progress is through their ads. Back in the day, make up ads would be even dubbed with male voice talents because beauty and image were defined from a man’s perspective. The Feminist Revolution has shifted the focus and spoke to women by women.

L’Oreal also has reinforced its Women of Worth campaign to reinforce the brand’s association with women empowerment.

The brand partnered with Marie Claire and kickstarted the #womenwishes campaign on twitter.

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At the end of the day, campaigns that capitalize on words are not enough. When a brand or company hinges on a cause and venture in Corporate Social Responsibility, there must a follow through. The agenda must be real. Companies must excavate their hearts that have been piled on by corporate blur. It’s time to go back to humanity.

And ads are just waiting to be conceived to once again stir the status quo and document history.#

(C) Brand and Pitches 2013

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The Rational, the Emotional, and the Controversial

In Ads and other executions on May 3, 2012 by Jox Tagged: , , , , ,

Ads have various approaches in showcasing a product/brand. When it comes to getting attention and imparting information, certain approaches fit the brand well. However, there are some ads that choose to disrupt consumer thoughts for its very sake.

THE RATIONAL

When introducing a new product whether under a known brand or also a completely new one, the ad should be rational. The basics must be covered: What is it? What does it do? Why should I buy it? The last question can play a bit on emotions such as celebrity associations or consumer reflections/realizations.

Just because an ad is rational it doesn’t meant it should be literal. That is an insult to the consumer especially when the product is a common consumer good. Even ads on technology and gadgets don’t go for the literal approach rather on educating and exciting the consumer via product showcase.

Colgate Sensitive Pro-relief directly approaches the problem of having sensitive teeth. Skeptical passers-by are challenged and they prove to themselves that the product works right then and there. The approach is direct: present the problem, attack it by presenting the product as the solution, solve the problem. Yet the ad does not just show a slide of the product’s function but incorporates consumer views to add to the authenticity which further convinces minds.

THE EMOTIONAL

When a brand has achieved a strong equity, meaning across all indicators from awareness to loyalty the brand is healthy, an emotional approach can be used. Emotional ads can reveal a truth about the brand, banking on the affinities of the consumers towards it. Although sometimes the product calls for an emotional approach such as Insurance companies. It would be weird if their ads sounded like their agents presenting a 15-year platform on returns on investments.

This Thai insurance ad has been known for its heavily dramatic ads. It does not underestimate the human power to love. And with love comes security and sacrifice. The ad highlights a riveting story that can happen to anyone.

THE CONTROVERSIAL

Ads that evoke adverse reactions for the sake of attention. There are a plethora of these featuring topics on religion, sex, and politics. They can be satirical or downright brutal. They work but may not necessarily be in a good way. Controversial ads are usually used by advocates that bring a marginalized issue mainstream. Controversial ads vary per country and culture.

Controversial ads like this one are done intentionally. They grab attention and gather different reactions. Any reaction is good. United Colors of Benetton has always touched on diversity and unity. The idea is simple yet the execution has exaggerated it to gain publicity.

WARNING: Example ad may be offensive.